Àngel Domínguez Pottery

The Àngel Domínguez pottery is the last trace of this traditional craft developed in Potries for centuries, an activity that reflects the way our ancestors lived and worked, as well as their cultural legacy. This millennial tradition and way of living ended with the death of Àngel Domínguez in 1983, the last active potter in the town.

Àngel Domínguez Pottery-Museum Facade.

It is located in a sector of the town where there were several potteries (up to a total of five documented at the beginning of the 20th century), around the old Terrisseria (Pottery) Street, which marked the outer urban limits, given the contaminating nature of this activity.

The house, built at the end of the 18th century, is a two-storey house with two main bodies and a central courtyard. Under the appearance of a traditional village house, it conceals a pottery workshop and a large kiln.

Its entrance looks alike many typical rural houses of the time, having a central space with rooms on both sides. The bedrooms are in the first bay.

Moving forward, in the second bay we find the core space of the traditional family life, around a table and a fireplace, where oral traditions were passed down from generation to generation.

Moving forward, in the second bay we find the core space of the traditional family life, around a table and a fireplace, where oral traditions were passed down from generation to generation.

 

Domestic area, the kitchen-dining-living room.

It occupies the entire second bay, and still preserves the original elements of the house, such as the fireplace, the kitchen, or the pantry with its shelves. This, together with the original furniture, tools and objects, allowed us to recreate the atmosphere of the most vital place in the house, which had the function of kitchen, dining room and living room.

In the third bay there is the workshop, where we can see a collection of typical devices and tools, such as the bench and the potter’s kick-wheel, the electric wheel’s bench, the electric motor and the transmitters, or the electric varnish mill. On the left side of the bay we also find an entry to a small room called the clay storehouse, where the clay plates decanted in the ponds were stored.

Craft area. The potter’s kick-wheel.

Further into the house, after the workshop area, there is a court where the decant ponds and the kiln are located. There are two decant ponds, a higher but smaller one where the mud and water were poured, and another lower but wider one where the clay already mixed and filtered was stomped.

Image of the decant ponds.

Next we see the kiln, where the casseroles, pots and other pottery pieces were fired, being a fundamental element in the pottery trade. With a vertical chimney, it is located at the end of the courtyard, and is also called the “morú” (sooty). It is made of solid bricks, with a thick masonry and lime mortar wall on the front, and two clearly differentiated parts, connected by an exterior staircase.

The fire place, at the bottom, is a rectangular space covered with a perforated barrel vault, and a small opening to insert the firewood and light the fire. Over it there is the firing chamber, a smaller, circular space covered with an also perforated vault where the pottery works were placed through an opening.

Image of the kiln.

The upper floor of the building is a diaphanous room without internal partitions, it is elevated by pillars and blind arches and covered by a very high gable roof. The last potter, Ángel Domínguez, raised the ceiling wanting to create a space where his children could live in the future, but when he realised that they would not continue his craft, he did not carry on with the works. Currently it is used as an exhibition room housing the historical pottery collection of our town.

Museum exhibition in the upper floor of the house.